Date Published: June 2019

Wind, S., Jones, E., Bergin, C. & Jensen, K. (2019). The effects of teacher and principal characteristics on evaluation of teaching effectiveness. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 61, 150-158.

Source

The following is a summary of the published research and key findings completed in 2019 and 2020 involving data from the Network for Educator Effectiveness evaluation system.

Publications

  1. Wind, S., Jones, E., Bergin, C. & Jensen, K. (2019). The effects of teacher and principal characteristics on evaluation of teaching effectiveness. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 61, 150-158. 10.1016/j.stueduc.2019.03.011. Key Findings: Principals’ ratings varied by teachers’ gender, years of experience, and school level, but not by shared demographic characteristics between principals and teachers. Principals rated female, experienced, and elementary teachers more highly than male, novice, and secondary teachers.
  2. Jones, E., & Bergin, C. (2019). Evaluating Teacher Effectiveness using Classroom Observations: A Rasch Analysis of the Rater Effects of Principals. Educational Assessment, 24(2), 91-118. 10.1080/10627197.2018.1564272. Key Findings: Principals generally (a) differentiated between more and less effective teachers, (b) rated their teachers with leniency (i.e., overused higher rating categories), and (c) differentiated between teaching practices (e.g., Cognitive Engagement vs. Classroom Management) with minimal halo effect. Individual principals varied significantly in degree of leniency, and approximately 12% of principals exhibited severe rater bias.
  3. Wind, S., Jones, E., Bergin, C. (in press). Principals’ Severity Affects Teacher Evaluation: Statistical Adjustments Mitigate Effects. School Effectiveness and School Improvement.

Presentations

  1. Li, X., and Kim, J. “Does quality principal feedback help improve teaching practices? Perspectives from the teachers and students in an authentic evaluation system.” Association for Education Finance and Policy Conference, March 19-21, 2020, Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas (virtual). Key Findings:  Teachers who received principal feedback with ceiling or higher scores tend to have better student-rated performance in cognitive engagement and problem-solving and critical thinking while controlling for their previous year performance scores.
  2. Li, X. “Examining the Causal Direction of Synchronous Effects In Structural Panel Models: Using Residual-Predictor Independence Tests to Identify Model Mis-specifications” Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness Conference, March 11-14, 2020, Crystal City, Virginia (virtual). Key Findings: When the synchronous effect was mis-specified or ignored in a panel model, erroneous conclusions would be made in the estimates of cross-lagged effects. The proposed predictor-residual independence tests were able to identify the pre-specified direction of the synchronous effect.
  3. Li, X., Prewett, S., Olsen, A. “Predictor Residual Independence Tests for Examining Causal Assumptions of Synchronous Effects Models.” American Psychological Association Conference, August 6-9, 2020, Washington, D.C. (virtual). Key Findings: Estimates of the cross-lagged effects and the consequent causal interpretations were biased, when the synchronous effect is either ignored, directionally mis-specified or a confounder exists. The proposed predictor-residual independence tests have satisfactory power to identify the “true” synchronous model with or without a confounder, and further enable the panel models to satisfactorily recover the parameters.